Install Theme
Jeff Wamester

color-palettes:

Shout out to this incredible color resource site! They give you anything and everything you could ever want to know about a color from color schemes to RGB percentage makeup. There’s even a color blindness simulator for help with using visible/accessible colors for all viewers.

So keep this site in mind if you’re a graphic designer, interior designer, artist, color enthusiast, or whatever! It’s quite awesome.

littleulvar:

when it comes to specific poses I try to first draw the most basic shapes and movement lines and then gradually go into more and more details, like so:

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if you have difficulties with perspective, try drawing a perspective grid first:

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it’s nothing different than tips from other artists, but I hope it helped a little ;u;

(via referensu)

18 tips for comics artists by Moebius "brief manual for cartoonist "

My 8house collaborator and impressive dude, Xurxo g Penalta translated this Spanish Moebius list of advice for artists. I thought would be cool to post. (Thanks Xurxo)
http: //www.jornada.unam.mx/1996/08/18/sem-moebius.html
1. when you draw you must clean yourself of deep feelings (hate, happiness, ambition, etc)
2 it's important to educate the hand, attain obedience, to full fill ideas. but careful with perfection, to much, as well as too much speed, as well as their opposites are dangerous. to much looseness, instant drawings,aside from mistakes, there's no will of the spirit, only the bodies.
3. perspective is of sum importance, it;s a law of manipulation in the good sense, to hypnotise the reader. it;s good to work in real spaces, more that with photos, to exercise our reading of perspective.
4.another thing to learn with affection is the study of the human body, the positions, the types, the expressions, the arquitecture of bodies, the difference between people. the drawing is very different when it come to a male or a female, because in the male you can change a little the lines, it supports to have some impressions. but with the female precision must be perfect, if not she may turn ugly or upset. then no one buys our book! so for the reader believes the story, the characters must have life and personality of their own, gestures that come from character, from their diseases; the body transforms with life and there's a message in the structure, in the distribution of fat, in every muscle, in every fold of the face and body. it;s a study of life.
5. when you make a story you can start with out knowing everything, but making notes (in the actual story) about the particular world of that story. that way the reader recognizes and becomes interested. when a character dies in a story, and that character has no story drawn in his face in his body, in his dress, the reader does not care, there's no emotion. and then the editors say: "your story is worthless, there's only one dead guys and I need 2) or 30 dead guys for it to work" but that is not true, if the dead guy, or wounded guy or sick guys or whomever is in trouble has a real personality that comes from study, from the artists capacity for observation, emotion will emerge (empathy). In the study you develop an attention for others, a compassion, and a love for humanity.
it's very important for the development of an artist, if he wants to be a mirror, it must contain inside it;s consciousness the whole world, a mirror that sees everything.
6. jodorwosky says I don't like drawing dead horses. it;s very difficult. it's very difficult to draw a body that sleeps, that's abandoned, because in comics you're always studying action. it;s easier to draw people fighting thats way Americans always draw superheroes. it;s more difficult to draw people talking, because there are a series of movements, very small, but that have a significance, and that accounts for more, because it need love, attention to the other, to the little things that speak of personality, of life. the superheores have no personality, all of them have the same gestures and movements (pantomimes ferocity, running and fighting)
7. equally important is the clothing of the characters, the state they;re in, the materials, the textures are a vision of their experiences, of their lives, their situation in the adventure, that can say a lot with out words. In a drew there's a million folds, you must chose 2 or 3, but the good ones.
8. the style, the stylistically continuity of an artist is symbolical, it can be read like the tarot. I chose as a joke the name Moebius, when I was 22, but in truth there's a meaning to that. if you bring a t shirt with Don Quixote, that speaks to me of who you are. in my case, I give importance to a drawing of relative simplicity, that way subtle indications can be made.
9. when an artist, a drawing artist goes out on the street, he does not see the same things other people see. what he sees is documentation about a way of life, about people.
10. another important element is composition. the composition on our stories must be studied, because a page, or a painting, is a face that looks towards (faces) the reader and that speaks to him. it's not a succession of panels with out meaning. there's panels that are full and some that are empty, others that have a vertical dynamic or a horizontal one, and on that there is intention. the vertical excites (cheers), the horizontal calms, an oblique to the right , for us westerners, represents the action heads towards the future, and oblique to the left directs action toward the past. points (points of attention) represent a dispersion of energy. something places in the middle focalises energy and attention, it concentrates.
these are basic symbols for reading, that exercise a fascination, a hypnosis. you must have a consciousness about rhythm, set traps for the reader to fall on to, and if he falls, and gets lost and may move inside them with pleasure because there's life. you must study the great painters, the ones that speak with their paintings, of any school or period, that does not matter, and they must be seen with that preoccupation for physical composition, but also emotional. in what way the combination of lines on that artist touches us directly in the heart.
11. narration must harmonize with the drawing. there must be a visual rhythm from the placement of words, plot must correctly maneuver cadence, to compress or expand time. must weary of the election and direction of characters. use them as a film director and study all different takes.
12. careful with the devastating influence of north american comics in mexico, they only study a little anatomy, dynamic composition, the monsters, the fights, the screaming and teeth (grin). I like them as well, but there are many other possibilities that must be explored.
13. there's a connection between music and drawing. but that depends also on the personality and the moment. for perhaps 10 years I've been working in silence, and for me the music is rhythm of the lines (the music he listens to).
to draw is sometimes to hunt for findings, an exact (fair, just) line is an orgasm!
14. color is a language that the artist (drawing artist) uses to manipulate the readers attention and to create beauty. there's objective and subjective color, the emotional states of the character influence the coloring and lighting can change from one panel to the next, depending on the space represented and the time of the day. the language of color must be studied with attention.
15. especially at the beginning of a career, one should work on short stories but of a very high quality. there's a better chance to finish them successfully and place them on a book or with editors.
16. there are times when we are headed to failure knowingly, we choose a theme, an existence, a technique that does not suit (convene) us. you must not complain afterwards.
17. when new pages are sent to editors and see rejection, we should ask for the reasons. we must study the reasons for failure and learn. it's not about struggle with our limitations or with public or the publishers. it's more about treating it like in aikido; the strength (power) of the attack is used to defeat him with the same effort.
18. now it is possible to find reader in any part of the planet. we must have this present. to begin with, drawing is a way of personal communication, but this does not imply that the artist must envelop himself in a bubble; it' communication with the beings near us, with oneself, but also with unknown people. Drawing is a medium to communicate with the great family we have not met, the public, the world.
august 18th 1996 compiled by Perez Ruiz

As a character artist that has been drawing traditionally since the beginning what is a good way to start transfer into painting digitally? I feel as though I don't have many portfolio pieces because I don't have them finished to the point of being digitally painted and that hinders studios from considering my portfolio. Is that true? Also I wanted to say I am truly inspired by you and when I get into a artistic slump one thing that always helps is your interview with Chris Oatley. Thank you.

2dbean:

Eric,

The way to start is to honestly quit reading this sentence and begin painting, Period. 

In fact, you shouldn’t even be reading this sentence right now, what are you still reading this for? 


Stop.  GO paint and come back in a few hours…I’ll wait here……

No really… GO

OK.  Back?  How was that?  Sucks huh?  You aren’t there yet.  What’s in your head isn’t on the digital canvas yet.  But it will be.  Given time, energy, and patience.  It will.  You’re learning workflow.  Lighting, where you like to start, if you enjoy working from a sketch or a blank canvas, what colors you enjoy seeing next to each other , and so many more ideas as you screw up, adjust, and paint some more.  It’s all building up steam.  But it just takes time and effort.  Things many artists don’t like to hear.  But the few who do?  They have careers.  Remember, the only difference between a professional and an Amateur is not quitting.  Well that, and meeting your deadlines….. being personable…. giving the client what they want….oh and  having a business sense…. well you get the picture.

For me, drawing is the first stage of a 4 part play. 

I think a brilliant draftsman can get a job and keep it.  But those people are rare in this industry. They’ll also have a certain something they add to their craft.  Like Glen Keane is a brilliant draftsman and animator, Nico Marlet adds a tone and light pencil to his design work, etc etc.

But people identify with you as an artist if you have something to say with your art.  Either it’s humor, sophistication, horror, story telling, etc.

It’s less about what do they want to see and more what do you want to show them.  If you want to be a line art guru than own it.  Learn a ton.  Cross hatching, variations on pencil tone, strokes, thick to thin. 

But don’t just “do something” because you think it will get you a job.  What if it doesn’t?  What if you spend the next 4 years doing it and you hate it and still no one hires you?  So now you’re broke and hate painting……That will really suck.  Learn to paint for the right reasons.  If you want to be a better painter and it will help you become a fuller artist, that’s the right reason.   So again…..quit reading this right now and paint…

We’ll wait here……

Cheers,

Bean

goknights:

BODY LANGUAGE REFERENCE SHEET

I’ve been reading up on body language and stuff trying to make my comics less stiff. I put my notes into reference sheet form so other people can use them. I actually took a while making this, so I hope you guys find it interesting!

Also, this font didn’t have apostrophes or quotes so a lot of things seem awkward!? Sorry about that.

also I didnt know this before I made it but the book I was taking notes on is already online… d’oh

emoxic:

sveltte:

I made a tutorial about mixing colors when painting! It’s really long and rambly and probably repeats itself a lot, but maybe it’ll be helpful to somebody. It’s intended for people who already have a basic understanding of color theory, so I might recommend this tutorial by gawki if you don’t already know the basics.

this is important. even basic painting classes worth anything should touch on this.

(via coffeemugtime)

Work for my personal project… More to come! ;)

atokniiro:

Success, a short comic about following your dreams

(made in celebration of my Facebook page reaching 100K Likes)

(via xsweetiepiex)

y-juba:

face tutorial by phobs

(Source: j-yuuba, via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

Claire’s fancy-pants HISTORICAL FASHION MASTER POST

shoomlah:

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So my historical costuming resources list from 2011 was less than a page long- I’m not saying that I’ve learned a lot in the past three years, but this list is now sitting pretty at a solid nine pages.  Whew.  And people wonder why I want to redo this damn series.

This list is by no means an exhaustive one- it’s a list of (primarily western) historical fashion resources, both online and offline, that is limited to what I know, own, or use!  It’s a work in progress, and I’m definitely hoping to expand on it as my knowledge base grows.  First things first, how about a little:

ADVICE FOR RESEARCHING HISTORICAL FASHION

  • Read, and read about more than just costuming.  Allowing yourself to understand the cultural and historical context surrounding the clothing of a particular region/period can be invaluable in sussing out good costume design.  Looking at pictures is all well and good, but reading about societal pressures, about construction techniques, daily routines, local symbolism, whatever else will really help you understand the rhyme and reason behind costuming from any given context.
  • Expand your costume vocabulary.  When you’re delving into a new topic, costuming or otherwise, picking up new terminology is essential to proper understanding and furthering your research.  Write down or take note of terms as you come across them- google them, look up synonyms, and use those words as a jumping off point for more research.  What’s a wire rebato?  How does it differ from a supportasse?  Inquiring minds want to know.
  • Double-check your sources.  Especially on the internet, and double especially on tumblr.  I love it, but it’s ground zero for rapidly spreading misinformation.  Books are usually your safest bet, but also take into account their date of publication, who’s writing them- an author’s biases can severely mangle their original source material.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Do everything you can to find out information on your own, but feel free to reach out to people with more specialized areas of knowledge for help!  Be considerate about it- the people you’re asking are busy as well- but a specific line of questioning that proves you’re passionate and that you respect their subject matter expertise can work wonders.

Okay, onto the links!

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It’s impossible to overstate the importance of getting off the internet and looking into books!  God bless the internet, but books are (generally, this isn’t a rule) better-researched and better-sourced.  Bibliographies also mean each individual books can be a jumping off point for further research, which is always a fantastic thing.

Remember- owning books is awesome and you should absolutely assemble your own library of resources, but LIBRARIES.  Libraries.  You’ll be surprised to find what books are available to you at your local library.

GENERAL / SURVEYS

Patterns fo Fashion books
Detailed, hand-drawn diagrams of historical fashion, inside and out.  Pretty amazing stuff.

Fashion in Detail books
Not what you want if you’re looking for photos of entire costumes- note the “in detail” bit up there.  Just a beautiful series, and great reference for all the little things you might miss otherwise.  The V&A has an amazing fashion collection, and it’s great to see them share it with the world.

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Read More

OMG this is amazing…